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How to Prepare the Soil for a New Flower Bed.

How to Prepare the Soil for a New Flower Bed.

How to Prepare the Soil for a New Flower Bed.. A flourishing flower bed adds a pop of color and extra curb appeal to your house, but too often, the beds can become repositories for droopy plants and unsightly weeds. While there are no guarantees with Mother Nature, taking a little extra time to prepare the flower bed soil before you plant improves...

A flourishing flower bed adds a pop of color and extra curb appeal to your house, but too often, the beds can become repositories for droopy plants and unsightly weeds. While there are no guarantees with Mother Nature, taking a little extra time to prepare the flower bed soil before you plant improves the odds.
Things You'll Need
Shovel
Compost or other organic material
Rototiller
Fertilizer
Remove the sod from the area of the bed. Pull or dig out weeds or other plants inside the bed’s perimeter.
Spread 2 to 3 inches of organic material -- compost, hay, dead leaves, manure, or peat moss -- over the surface of the bed.
Turn the organic material into the soil with a tiller or shovel, to about 8 inches deep. As you turn the soil, break up large dirt clods.
Add a balanced fertilizer, like 12-12-12, to the soil, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
Tips & Warnings
You may choose to test the soil to determine the specific amendments needed, rather than using a general fertilizer. Order a soil test kit online, or check with your county extension agent about local testing options.
Continue to protect and enrich your soil by mulching around the plants with more organic material. A topping of mulch looks attractive, helps hold moisture in the soil, and slows or even stops weed growth.
If the flower bed contains many rocks, don't use a rototiller. The blades of the tiller can turn a rock into a dangerous projectile. Use a shovel, hoe, or spading fork to avoid injuries or broken windows.

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