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How to Propagate Allamanda Schottii From Cuttings

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How to Propagate Allamanda Schottii From Cuttings

How to Propagate Allamanda Schottii From Cuttings. Hardy only in USDA Zones 9-11, Allamanda schotti blooms copiously all summer through fall. These plants root readily from cuttings. Stems can be taken early in the spring, following the first flush of new growth. Since you should prune your schotti at that time anyway, just use some of the...

Hardy only in USDA Zones 9-11, Allamanda schotti blooms copiously all summer through fall. These plants root readily from cuttings. Stems can be taken early in the spring, following the first flush of new growth. Since you should prune your schotti at that time anyway, just use some of the clippings to start new plants.
Things You'll Need
2 ?-inch clay pot
Clean, sharp knife
Rooting powder
Clear plastic bag
Rubber band
Toothpicks
4-inch clay pot
All-purpose potting soil
Prepare a 2 ?-inch clay starting pot ahead of time so that it will be ready for your cutting right away. Clay is best because it provides for maximum drainage. Combine equal parts Perlite and peat moss and fill the pot to within ? inch of the rim. Set it in a tray of water until the surface soil feels moist to the touch. Drain it for an hour or two.
Use a clean, sharp knife to clip a 6-inch stem cutting from fresh new growth. It should have at least three or four fully formed leaves at the tip. Keep it moist until you can get it planted.
Make a diagonal cut to shorten the stem back to about 4 inches. Remove all of the leaves and buds from the lower half. Moisten the bottom inch of the stem and dip it into rooting powder. Plant it in the prepared starting pot and water enough to evenly moisten the surface of the soil. Donít soak it to the point of being soggy or wet.
Cover the pot with a clear plastic bag and secure it into place with a rubber band to create a bubble for moisture retention. Poke some holes in it with a toothpick to facilitate air circulation. Place it in a warm, brightly lit area out of direct sunlight such as above a hot water heater or on top of a refrigerator. Your allamanda cutting should root within two to four weeks.
Check the soil every day to make sure that it remains evenly moist. Remove the bag when you begin seeing tiny new growth.
Transplant the cutting into a 4-inch clay pot with all-purpose potting soil. Place it on a sunny windowsill in a warm room. Keep the soil evenly moist, but not wet.
Feed the young plant a water-soluble fertilizer mixed at half strength every two weeks throughout the growing season. Follow the manufacturerís recommendations carefully.
Tips & Warnings
Donít eat your allamanda. All parts of the plant are extremely toxic.
Donít discard trimmings anywhere you donít want them to root themselves and take over.

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