Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How to Care for Sequoia Trees

How to Care for Sequoia Trees

How to Care for Sequoia Trees. The sequoia tree, which is also called a California redwood and a coastal redwood, is actually a member of the cypress family. It is the tallest growing tree in the world and can live to be up to 2,000 years old. Because of their longevity, it is not uncommon for the trunk of a sequoia to grow to a diameter of 7 feet...

The sequoia tree, which is also called a California redwood and a coastal redwood, is actually a member of the cypress family. It is the tallest growing tree in the world and can live to be up to 2,000 years old. Because of their longevity, it is not uncommon for the trunk of a sequoia to grow to a diameter of 7 feet wide. Sequoias are most frequently located in California and parts of Oregon, however they can be grown in other zones as well.
Things You'll Need
Top soil
Sequoia fertilizer, liquid
Pruning shears
Rake
Plant small sequoias no closer than 6 feet to another tree. Sequoias need at least 6 feet of space when full grown. If you have a giant sequoia variety, space them 30 to 60 feet apart.
Avoid disturbing the soil near the sequoias, and avoid excessive walking near the trees. Sequoia trees have very shallow and fragile feeder root systems. Walking on the ground near the sequoia tree can compress the soil and break these roots. Trees with broken roots are highly susceptible to dying.
Apply a 3- to 4-inch-high circle of soil around the base of the tree to create a water dam. The soil can be taken from other areas of the landscape, or a topsoil mix can be used. Fill the water dam completely with water from a garden hose once or twice per week. During times of excessive heat or drought, additional watering may be necessary. Do not let the soil around the base of the sequoia dry out.
Fertilize the sequoia with a liquid-based fertilizer that is specifically designed for sequoias. You will need to order this fertilizer online unless you live near California or other areas native to the sequoia. Pour 2 gallons of pure liquid fertilizer into the basin around the base of the tree every two weeks during the warm months.
Prune dead limbs from the sequoia tree by cutting the limbs off as close to the trunk as possible with sharp pruning shears.
Rake up all leaves, pine straw and other debris within a 3-foot circle around the base of the tree. This will eliminate nesting areas for pests, slugs and insects that can damage the sequoia. Try not to hit the trunk of the tree with the rake as you clean around it.

Check out these related posts