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How to Grow Hypericum Berries

How to Grow Hypericum Berries

How to Grow Hypericum Berries. Hypericum plants are more commonly called St. John's wort or goat weed. The plant produces small yellow flowers with long spikes that emerge from the center of the blooms during the early spring months. Hypericum berries, which develop in the fall, grow along a single stalk rather than in clusters and can range in...

Hypericum plants are more commonly called St. John's wort or goat weed. The plant produces small yellow flowers with long spikes that emerge from the center of the blooms during the early spring months. Hypericum berries, which develop in the fall, grow along a single stalk rather than in clusters and can range in colors including red, peach, green, yellow and orange. The berries are frequently used as accents in floral arrangements and are easy to grow.
Things You'll Need
Hypericum plant
Shovel
Water
Purchase a Hypericum androsaemum plant. This plant is often identified as St. John's wort, but it must also be labeled as Hypericum androsaemum, since not all St. John's wort plants produce berries.
Wait until the threat of frost has passed in the spring and select an outdoor location for the hypericum plant. Choose a location that receives full sunlight for most of the day and has well-drained soil.
Use a shovel to dig a hole as deep and wide as the nursery pot. Plant the hypericum so that the existing soil is level with the surface of the ground.
Place the plant into the hole and fill in the hole with soil, making sure to cover all of the roots.
Water the plant with 1 to 2 inches of water after planting. After the initial planting, water the plant whenever the top 1 inch of soil is dry to the touch.
Wait until September and examine the plant for signs of berry growth. Once developed, the berries last through the winter months until they are replaced by new flower blossoms in the spring.
Tips & Warnings
If growing the hypericum berries from seed, plant them in early spring.
Hypericum plants do not require fertilizer to thrive, although you can apply it if desired.

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