Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

Lupine Diseases

Lupine Diseases

Lupine Diseases. Lupines (Lupinis) are annual or perennial herbs belonging to the pea family (Fabaceae). Common varieties include the Texas bluebonnet, the Carolina lupine and the wild lupine. Lupine plants are susceptible to a number of plant diseases.

Lupines (Lupinis) are annual or perennial herbs belonging to the pea family (Fabaceae). Common varieties include the Texas bluebonnet, the Carolina lupine and the wild lupine. Lupine plants are susceptible to a number of plant diseases.
Fungal Diseases
Lupines are susceptible to numerous fungal diseases including root rot (Pythium), downy mildew (Peronospora), powdery mildew (Erysiphe) and rust (Puccinia).
Effects
Symptoms of fungal diseases include brownish-black, collapsed roots and rust-colored spores forming on stems or leaves. Downy mildew appears as gray or white patches on leaves, while powdery mildew causes a coating of white or gray dust to form on leaves.
Viral Diseases
Lupine plants are vulnerable to the mosaic and ringspot virus. Symptoms include mottled or yellowed leaves, stunted growth and deformed flowers and buds.
Leaf Spots
Leaf spots commonly appear on lupine plants. These spots are caused by various pathogens and are more prevalent during wet conditions.
Pests
Nematodes, aphids (Macrosiphum albifrons) and garden millipedes (Macrosiphum albifrons) most commonly attack lupines. Nematodes are the most serious, attacking and feeding on the plant's root system and causing the foliage to wilt and lose color.
Control
Infected lupines should be removed and destroyed immediately so they don't spread diseases to other plants. Reducing leaf wetness and humidity levels can prevent most lupine diseases.

Check out these related posts