Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How Mycorrhizae Fungi Affect Trees

How Mycorrhizae Fungi Affect Trees

How Mycorrhizae Fungi Affect Trees. An unlikely relationship exists between some fungal species -- called mycorrhizae -- and the trees in your backyard. Although the fungi attach themselves to the tree roots, they are not parasitic. They work together so that each benefits from the relationship.

An unlikely relationship exists between some fungal species -- called mycorrhizae -- and the trees in your backyard. Although the fungi attach themselves to the tree roots, they are not parasitic. They work together so that each benefits from the relationship.
A Love Affair
The two primary types of mycorrhizae colonize tree roots, but they target different parts of the roots. Endomycorrhizae, also called arbuscular mycorrhizae -- abbreviated AM -- grow inside the tree roots. Ectomycorrhizae – abbreviated EM -- grow around the outside of tree roots. As the fungi grow, they send out thin strands called hyphae into the soil. Because the mycorrhizae are attached to tree roots, their hyphae act like extensions of the roots. This increases the absorptive capacity of a tree’s root system to take up water and minerals. The payoff for the mycorrhizal fungi is an exchange of sugars -- the products of photosynthesis that a tree manufactures -- which mycorrhizae must have to live.
AM Host Trees
Trees that typically host AM fungi include sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides), both of which are perennials in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 9. Redbud (Cercis canadensis), hardy in USDA zones 4 through 8, and persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), hardy in USDA zones 4 through 9, are other AM hosts. New seedling sweet gum trees typically experience low growth rates in the first three to five years after planting. The seedlings are significantly healthier, however, when grown in AM-rich soil during this same establishment period.
EM Host Trees
A tipoff that EM fungi are hard at work is the presence of mushrooms, which are fungal fruiting bodies, around trees. Host trees for EM fungi include the common beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), both hardy in USDA zones 4 through 7. These host trees may have more than one type of EM fungi attached to their roots that produce plant growth regulatory hormones, called auxins, to enhance root growth. Pinus species plants, including whitebark pine (Pinus albacaulis) in USDA zones 6 through 8, depend on mycorrhizal fungi for their survival.
The Benefits
Most plants that share beneficial relationships with mycorrhizal fungi experience increased growth, higher survival rates, increased disease resistance and enhanced nutrition compared to non-mycorrhizal plants, according to The Ohio State University Extension. Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service notes that mycorrhizal fungi can boost the growth of some tree seedlings by 400 percent. Mycorrhizae also enable seedlings to better withstand drought and poor soil and to grow as large as non-mycorrhizal plants with half the nutrients.

Check out these related posts