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How Tall Do Japanese Split Leaf Maples Get?

How Tall Do Japanese Split Leaf Maples Get?

How Tall Do Japanese Split Leaf Maples Get?. The Japanese Split-Leaf Maple is usually planted as an ornamental tree. Its unique leaf color and slow growth rate allow the tree to be a focal point in different types of landscapes. Planting and caring for the tree is simple, making this tree a favorite among gardeners.

The Japanese Split-Leaf Maple is usually planted as an ornamental tree. Its unique leaf color and slow growth rate allow the tree to be a focal point in different types of landscapes. Planting and caring for the tree is simple, making this tree a favorite among gardeners.
Growth
The Japanese Split-Leaf Maple tree, commonly knows as the Japanese maple, grows 15 to 25 feet tall and has a canopy spread of 10 to 25 feet in width. This deciduous tree prefers part-shade, moist, well-drained soils.
Foliage
The Japanese maple has a variety of leaf colors from green, purple, red or variegated. This tree's leaves change during fall and provide vibrant outdoor color.
Care
The Japanese maple prefers morning sun and afternoon shade. To plant, dig a hole twice as wide as the root ball and as deep as the root ball. Place it in the hole, cover with rich soil, and water promptly. Allow the tree extra water to establish its root growth and survive transplanting. Pruning should only be done in the fall to mid-winter when the tree is dormant.

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