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Facts on Chocolate Mimosa Tree

Facts on Chocolate Mimosa Tree

Facts on Chocolate Mimosa Tree. Mimosa trees (Albizia julibrissin) produce ferny foliage and sweetly scented blooms, which attract hummingbirds and butterflies. The leaves of chocolate mimosa (Albizia julibrissin “Summer Chocolate”) turn a luscious mahogany color when the tree is grown in full sun.

Mimosa trees (Albizia julibrissin) produce ferny foliage and sweetly scented blooms, which attract hummingbirds and butterflies. The leaves of chocolate mimosa (Albizia julibrissin "Summer Chocolate") turn a luscious mahogany color when the tree is grown in full sun.
Pretty But Tough
Also called silk tree, a mimosa looks delicate, but it is a drought-tolerant, fast-growing trees that grows in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 through 10. Chocolate mimosa grows 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide and has a wide, umbrella-shaped canopy. It provides dappled shade and a tropical look.
Take Good Care
Soak young trees weekly to establish a strong root system. Prune out brittle or crossing branches. Mimosas litter the ground with fallen blossoms, leaves, twigs and seedpods, so keep your rake handy for what will become an ongoing chore. Pull up seedlings so your yard isn't overrun by this invasive plant. Chocolate mimosa is a natural variant, so its seeds are viable. Do not plant it if you live in an area where it's considered invasive.

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