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Growth Rates of Maple Trees

Growth Rates of Maple Trees

Growth Rates of Maple Trees. Maple trees vary widely in color, size, shape and growth rate, depending on the type. Dozens of maple tree varieties exist, located in areas throughout the United States.

Maple trees vary widely in color, size, shape and growth rate, depending on the type. Dozens of maple tree varieties exist, located in areas throughout the United States.
Fast
Considered by some people as a poor quality tree, the red maple actually grows quickly and vigorously when provided with the proper growing conditions and maintenance. The silver maple has a fast growth rate as well, but often proves difficult to grow because of its susceptibility to ice damage and wind breakage.
Moderate
The Florida maple grows at a moderate pace in USDA plant hardiness zones 6b through 9a, reaching a final height of around 60 feet. The Norway maple grows at a similar pace, with a maximum annual increase of no more than 18 inches, but remains hardy through Zone 4.
Slow
Examples of slow-growing maples include the Japanese maple tree and the sugar maple, averaging an annual growth of only 12 inches. While the Japanese maple tree rarely reaches more than 25 feet at maturity, the sugar maple grows to 100 feet or more when fully grown.

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