Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

Is a Juniper a Cedar Tree?

Is a Juniper a Cedar Tree?

Is a Juniper a Cedar Tree?. Junipers are members of the Juniperus genus and the Cupressaceae or cypress family. About 60 known species of juniper are scattered around the world. Cedars are known botanically by the genus name Cedrus and are members of the Pinaceae or pine family. Junipers and cedars are evergreens.

Junipers are members of the Juniperus genus and the Cupressaceae or cypress family. About 60 known species of juniper are scattered around the world. Cedars are known botanically by the genus name Cedrus and are members of the Pinaceae or pine family. Junipers and cedars are evergreens.
Few True Cedars
The confusion between the two genera is due to the common names of some species. According to "Hortus Third," there are about 35 shrubs and trees with the word "cedar" in their common names. Only three of them are actually classified in the genus Cedrus.
Junipers Called Cedar
At least six juniper species have "cedar" as part of their common names. Those six are: Bermuda cedar (Juniperous bermudiana), Colorado red cedar (Juniperous scopulorum), creeping cedar (Juniperous horizontalis), Ozark white cedar (Juniperous ashei), Eastern red cedar (Juniperous virginiana) and Southern red cedar (Juniperous silicicola).
Uses
Junipers and cedars are both exceptionally useful plants, with many landscape applications. One juniper species, Juniperous communis, is also used for culinary purposes, most notably as a flavoring for gin. Cedar is noted for the fragrance of the wood and for its resistance to rot.

Check out these related posts