Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

White Fungus on a Japanese Maple

White Fungus on a Japanese Maple

White Fungus on a Japanese Maple. Nearly all ornamental plants suffer infection of the fungal disease known as powdery mildew. Japanese maple trees are likely to survive an attack, although the disorder can be unsightly.

Nearly all ornamental plants suffer infection of the fungal disease known as powdery mildew. Japanese maple trees are likely to survive an attack, although the disorder can be unsightly.
Identification
A white fungus known as powdery mildew is one of several leaf diseases prone to attacking the brightly colored Japanese maple tree, Acer palmatum. "Japanese maples may be troubled by anthracnose, powdery mildew, leaf spot, leaf scorch, root rot, aphids, scales and borers," according to the Clemson University Extension service.
Powdery Mildew
Powdery mildew appears as a white or gray fungal substance throughout the leaves, stems, flowers and fruit of a plant. The Ohio State University Extension service notes that leaves may curl or twist even before the white fungus is apparent. "Severe powdery mildew infection will result in yellowed leaves, dried and brown leaves, and disfigured shoots and flowers," according to the OSU website.
Effects
The disease rarely results in fatality to a Japanese maple, but it may increase the likelihood of leaves falling prematurely and the tree moving into fall dormancy earlier than normal. Trees typically suffer infection when temperatures range between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit; powdery mildew normally does not appear during the extreme heat of summer.

Check out these related posts