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The Growth Rate of a Bloodgood Japanese Maple

The Growth Rate of a Bloodgood Japanese Maple

The Growth Rate of a Bloodgood Japanese Maple. The Bloodgood Japanese maple grows into a rounded shape with a globose canopy and multiple trunks leading to the renowned foliage of the tree. It grows best in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5B through 8.

The Bloodgood Japanese maple grows into a rounded shape with a globose canopy and multiple trunks leading to the renowned foliage of the tree. It grows best in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5B through 8.
Overall Growth
The University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service reports that the growth rate of a Bloodgood Japanese maple tree is considered to be slow, typically achieving an overall height of 12 to 20 feet and a spread of 15 to 20 feet. The leaves often remain red for most of a summer.
Considerations
The growth rate of a Bloodgood Japanese maple is often affected by its environment. "Due to poor growth in poorly drained soil, it is often planted on raised beds or on high ground in clay soil," according to University of Florida extension. Diseases and damage from pests may also slow the growth of the tree.
Annual Growth
Like all Japanese maples, the annual growth rate is relatively slow, often less than 1 foot per year, or approximately 10 to 15 feet in the first 15 years of life. The majority of the growth occurs early in the lifespan of the tree, according to Clemson University Cooperative Extension.

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