Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How Do I Tell If the Hibiscus Bush I Just Bought Is Perennial or Tropical?

How Do I Tell If the Hibiscus Bush I Just Bought Is Perennial or Tropical?

How Do I Tell If the Hibiscus Bush I Just Bought Is Perennial or Tropical?. Perennial hibiscus plants are also called hardy hibiscus plants. The main difference between hardy and tropical versions of the plant are the temperature requirements. The tropical hibiscus requires a warm climate year-round. Whereas the hardy hibiscus can tolerate cold...

Perennial hibiscus plants are also called hardy hibiscus plants. The main difference between hardy and tropical versions of the plant are the temperature requirements. The tropical hibiscus requires a warm climate year-round. Whereas the hardy hibiscus can tolerate cold weather -- dying back to the ground during the winter months, and then shooting up again in the spring. Knowing the type of hibiscus plant you purchased allows you to care for it properly. If you live in a cold climate, expect to take extra measures to protect your new plant.
Inspect the leaves of your plant. Deep green leaves with a high gloss signify a tropical hibiscus. Heart-shaped, dull-colored leaves signify a hardy hibiscus.
Check the flower color of the plant. Hardy hibiscus flowers have red, pink or white flowers, according to the Tropical Hibiscus website. Tropical plants have bright salmon, peach, orange or yellow blooms.
Inspect the shape of the flower. The tropical variety has double flowers, while the hardy hibiscus has large buds in the center of its flowers, averaging about 2 to 4 inches in size.
Consider the current season and where you bought your hibiscus plant. If it's cold outside and you purchased the plant from an outdoor display, you have a hardy plant. The tropical hibiscus needs warm weather or a greenhouse environment to survive.

Check out these related posts