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How to Use Herbs to Freshen the Air

How to Use Herbs to Freshen the Air

How to Use Herbs to Freshen the Air. Using fresh or dried herbs to freshen the air inside your home is far superior to coating your environment with chemical-based products. The leaves, seeds or flowers of aromatics such as rosemary, cinnamon, pine cones, cloves, cardamom, mint and lavender release natural scents when dried, crushed, simmered or...

Using fresh or dried herbs to freshen the air inside your home is far superior to coating your environment with chemical-based products. The leaves, seeds or flowers of aromatics such as rosemary, cinnamon, pine cones, cloves, cardamom, mint and lavender release natural scents when dried, crushed, simmered or burned.
A classic way to spice up autumn or winter air is to boil a mixture of whole cloves, cinnamon sticks, fennel, anise, nutmeg or cardamon pods with water, then let it gently simmer on the stove for a few minutes or in a slow cooker for up to four hours. For an earthy, spring fragrance, boil fresh herbs, fruit slices and seeds, then display them with the water in open glass jars. Experiment with combinations of things such as lemon or orange slices, peppercorns, star anise, basil, fresh thyme, cinnamon sticks, oregano and sage, using three items at at time until you find a mixture that appeals to you.
Another way to fill your home with herbal fragrances is to grow honeysuckle, lavender, jasmine, basil or rosemary as indoor plants. Crush dried flowers and herbs into a potpourri and placed it in bowls around the house, or sew the concoction into fabric sachet packets for drawers and linen closets. Freshen up carpets with powdered and dried lavender mixed with baking soda and cornstarch. Toss small amounts of rosemary branches, pine cones or dried pine needles into a roaring fire for some snap, crackle and pop of pleasantly pungent aromas.

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