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How to Dry Citrus for Potpourri

How to Dry Citrus for Potpourri

How to Dry Citrus for Potpourri. Members of the citrus family, such as grapefruit, lemon and lime, are particularly easy to air-dry and add as an ingredient to potpourri. Follow these simple steps to preserve your favorite citrus fruits and bring nature's beauty and zest to your room.

Members of the citrus family, such as grapefruit, lemon and lime, are particularly easy to air-dry and add as an ingredient to potpourri. Follow these simple steps to preserve your favorite citrus fruits and bring nature's beauty and zest to your room.
Things You'll Need
Citrus fruits
Small, sharp knife
Choose the fruits you would like to dry. Small citrus fruits, such as key limes and kumquats, can be dried whole. While larger fruits, such as grapefruits, oranges and lemons, hold their color and fragrance when dried in slices or strips of peel.
If you have chosen one of the larger citrus fruits to dry as strips of peel, remove the remaining membrane away from the fruit's skin after squeezing the juice or eating the fruit.
Using a small knife, carefully cut away the inner white part of the fruit's skin called the pith. Take your time with this step and leave the pieces of the fruit's outer skin intact.
Slice the skin into thin slivers and place them on a flat surface, such as a baking sheet or tray, in a single layer. If you use a lot of citrus fruits in your household, it won't take long to build up a good supply of dried peel.
Place the strips of peel in a warm, dry spot with a temperature range of 65? to 100? F. Allow the strips to air-dry for 2 to 3 days until crisp. Add the dried citrus to potpourri and other fragrant home crafts.
Tips & Warnings
The peel of one orange makes about a ? ounce of slivered dried peel.

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