Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How to Identify Fruit Trees by Leaves

How to Identify Fruit Trees by Leaves

How to Identify Fruit Trees by Leaves. Don’t wait for your fruit tree to bear fruit to identify it. Instead, examine the characteristics of its leaves and compare your observations to a database about trees, such as a field guide for trees or a university‘s agriculture or horticulture website. After identifying your tree, you can care...

Don’t wait for your fruit tree to bear fruit to identify it. Instead, examine the characteristics of its leaves and compare your observations to a database about trees, such as a field guide for trees or a university‘s agriculture or horticulture website. After identifying your tree, you can care for it in a manner that is specific to its needs so you can reap a plentiful and succulent harvest.
Step 1
Observe the shape of the leaves. The leaves may be oval or oblong like an apple tree or lobed like a fig tree. They may also be long and narrow like mango or peach tree leaves.
Step 2
Notice if the margins around the leaves are smooth or have teeth or spines. The edges of fruit tree leaves are usually smooth like grapefruit tree leaves, or have fine teeth, like cherry tree leaves.
Step 3
Examine the shine on the leaves. Leaves may be dull like apple tree leaves, or glossy or waxed, like orange tree leaves.
Step 4
Note the leaf color, which can be dark green like tangerine tree leaves, bright green like nectarine tree leaves or light green like mulberry tree leaves. Some leaves are evergreen, like those in the citrus family.
Step 5
Observe any other identifying characteristics. For example, peach tree leaves curve inward and mango leaves are thick and leathery.
Step 6
Compare your observations to the leaf descriptions in a tree field guide book, such as the "National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees" or on a reputable website, such as Purdue University’s "Senior Study Fruit and Nuts."

Check out these related posts