Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How to Root Willow Branches

How to Root Willow Branches

How to Root Willow Branches. Willow trees are one of the easiest trees to propagate from cuttings. Taking a cutting and forcing it to grow roots to develop a new tree that is much like the parent tree takes little special knowledge. It is easily accomplished, generally with items that already are on hand or can be purchased inexpensively. The best...

Willow trees are one of the easiest trees to propagate from cuttings. Taking a cutting and forcing it to grow roots to develop a new tree that is much like the parent tree takes little special knowledge. It is easily accomplished, generally with items that already are on hand or can be purchased inexpensively. The best time to obtain cuttings is from late fall to early winter. A cutting taken from a younger tree generally will root easier than one taken from an older tree.
Things You'll Need
Scissors
Willow tree
Peat moss
Soil
Container
Water
Take a cutting from a healthy plant. Choose a small branch that has well-formed leaves, and cut a section that is 4 to 10 inches long.
Fill a container with an equal mixture of good potting soil and peat moss. Water the medium deeply enough to cause drainage from the bottom of the container. Allow time for it to dry thoroughly.
Remove any lower leaves from the willow cutting. Leave two or three sets of leaves at the top.
Use the blade of the scissors to gently scrape the bark on two sides of the cutting at the bottom. This is called wounding and will aid in root formation.
Dip the cutting into a rooting hormone, and coat it thoroughly.
Plant the cutting in the container deeply enough to allow it to stand on its own. Place the pot in a location that is warm and receives sun from the north or east. A sunny window or greenhouse is ideal.
Check the cutting regularly to ensure that the medium is damp. Water when necessary, but do not allow the soil to become soggy.
Roots generally will appear in six to eight weeks. Once roots are well established and new growth is observed, the cutting is ready to be moved to a permanent location.
Tips & Warnings
The ideal temperature for a rooting cutting is 60 to 65 degrees.
If the cutting becomes established during colder weather, plant it in a larger container, and keep it indoors until spring.

Check out these related posts