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Oak Trees & Acorns

Oak Trees & Acorns

Oak Trees & Acorns. Oak trees are known for their sturdy timber. In the fall, the deciduous trees prepare for colder weather by shedding leaves that have turned bright red. Oaks can take up to 100 years to reach maturity. Their average lifespan is around 200 years, although they have been known to live several hundred years longer. Oak trees begin...

Oak trees are known for their sturdy timber. In the fall, the deciduous trees prepare for colder weather by shedding leaves that have turned bright red. Oaks can take up to 100 years to reach maturity. Their average lifespan is around 200 years, although they have been known to live several hundred years longer. Oak trees begin to produce acorn seeds after 50 years. The trees are generally broken down into white and red oak species.
White Oak Trees
White oak trees range in size from 60 to 150 feet. The rough bark is light grayish in color, and the leaves are a shiny green. Acorns from the white oak normally fall before cold weather hits, killing the seed. However, squirrels are known to scatter and bury the acorns, which helps germinate the species. White oaks are one of the most well-known oaks, and are found more in the eastern sections of the United States, such as Delaware and Maryland.
Red Oak Trees
The red oak tree is known for growing at a faster pace. It stretches to heights of 80 feet, on average, but can grow up to 150 feet. Red oaks have a more complicated root system, which digs itself deeper into the ground. The leaves are a shiny dark green, changing to a deep reddish color in the fall before shedding. Red oaks are more often found flourishing in the eastern and midwestern parts of the United States.
Oak Tree Coloring
Of all the oaks, the red oak tree is the most colorful year-round. Spring brings on pink, furry leaves that turn green in the summer and change into a deep red in the autumn season. White oak trees produce green leaves through the spring and summer months, which turn a violet color in the fall. The white oak hangs onto its leaves throughout the winter, only to shed them when new buds are ready to appear.
Acorns
In earlier centuries, many people consumed acorns for protein when other foods were not available. The acorn can be stored throughout the colder months, while many other foods perish. They mature on the tree four months after they are pollinated. It takes another month before acorns fall to the ground to germinate, usually in the months of September and October.
Acorn Germination
The light brown color on the acorn signifies readiness to germinate. Oak trees begin to show acorn seeds between 50 and 200 years of age, although some trees are known to produce seeds as early as 20 years in more open growing areas. Thousands of acorns are produced on a healthy tree in one calendar year. Once established, the seedlings can grow 2 or more feet a year.

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