Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How to Build a Concrete Block Planter

How to Build a Concrete Block Planter

How to Build a Concrete Block Planter. Garden planters add special definition to your garden. The walls can form boundaries from one part of your yard to another. Building these planters from scratch rather than buying them from a store gives you a lot of flexibility. You determine the size and shape of the planter as well as its depth. Built-in...

Garden planters add special definition to your garden. The walls can form boundaries from one part of your yard to another. Building these planters from scratch rather than buying them from a store gives you a lot of flexibility. You determine the size and shape of the planter as well as its depth. Built-in planters also add permanence to the yard, called hardscape. Hardscape helps make an outdoor space feel finished.
Things You'll Need
Tape measure
Spray paint
Shovel
Concrete
Cement blocks
Mortar
Rebar
Trowel
Dig a trench around the perimeter of your planter. Dig 8 inches deep with straight sides. Mix concrete and water in a large wheelbarrow according to package directions. Pour the trench half full of concrete. Lay two pieces of 1/2-inch rebar in the trench on all sides. Fill the trench with concrete. Let the foundation set overnight.
Spread 1/2 inch of mortar on the bottom and sides of an L-shaped block. Set the block in the corner of the planter. Lay the entire first row, or course, of blocks.
Set the second row of blocks. Set each block so its joint is centered over a block beneath it.
Slide rebar into the space inside the block. Set 15-inch rebar into the open space of every other block. Pour concrete into the hole with the rebar to fill the space.
Set any additional rows of block you may want, depending on your planterís size and height.
Spread mortar along the bottom and sides of a concrete cap piece. Set the cap on top of the wall. Leave two inches of overhang on the sides of the planter. Let the mortar set overnight.
Tips & Warnings
Paint your concrete block to coordinate with your homeís color scheme. Use outdoor masonry paint on the concrete block.

Check out these related posts