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Fruit Tree Planting Guide

Fruit Tree Planting Guide

Fruit Tree Planting Guide. Fruit trees thrive in the home landscape when planted correctly. To ensure healthy growth and maximum fruit production, keep critical planting requirements in mind.

Fruit trees thrive in the home landscape when planted correctly. To ensure healthy growth and maximum fruit production, keep critical planting requirements in mind.
Types
There are many home garden fruit trees. Some deciduous types are apple, pear, plum, apricot, fig, peach, nectarine and cherry. Evergreen selections include semi-tropical and tropical trees such as citrus, banana, lychee, mango, papaya, passion fruit and guava.
Time Frame
Plant fruit trees in early spring once the ground has thawed and is no longer waterlogged.
Planting Site
Locate fruit trees in a minimum of six hours of sun a day. Soil should be well-draining and provide at least 18 inches of topsoil above the hardpan. Plant in raised beds if such conditions don't exist.
Soil Preparation
Dig the planting hole the depth of the root-ball and at least twice as wide. Don't dig the soil at the bottom of the hole because this may cause the tree to sink after planting.
Planting
Trim off damaged roots. Place the root-ball in the planting hole so the mound above the roots (bud union) is 2 to 4 inches above the soil surface. Backfill with excavated soil and firmly pat down as you go until the bud union is 1 to 2 inches above ground. Water thoroughly.

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