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How to Do Scalloped Brick Garden Edging

How to Do Scalloped Brick Garden Edging

How to Do Scalloped Brick Garden Edging. Edging sets a garden off and ensures that it is considered a planned part of the landscaping and not just a jumble of plants that happen to be in one place. Commercial scalloped bricks that easily create an edge are available at home and garden stores, and a few hours on the weekend with a shovel will give a...

Edging sets a garden off and ensures that it is considered a planned part of the landscaping and not just a jumble of plants that happen to be in one place. Commercial scalloped bricks that easily create an edge are available at home and garden stores, and a few hours on the weekend with a shovel will give a finished look to the garden.
Things You'll Need
Bricks
Heavy cord
Spray paint
Flat-bladed shovel
Trowel
Landscape fabric
Sand
Rubber maul
Bubble level
Lay the path of the garden edge with the cord. Avoid sharp corners and tight curves. Manufacturers provide information on the bricks to show how tight of a radius you can make.
Spray paint along the line to mark where you will dig. Remove the cord.
Dig a trench along the path with the flat-bladed shovel. The depth is determined by the manufacturer's directions plus an additional inch, and the width is just a little wider than the brick. Remove the dirt from the trench with the hand trowel.
Line the trench with the landscape fabric, in a U-shape.
Fill the bottom inch of the trench with sand. Smooth it out with the trowel.
Place the left-most brick in the side of the trench, and tap it a few times with the rubber maul on the top and the right side to seat it firmly. Place the bubble level on the top of the brick, and ensure that the bubble is centered between the marks.
Continue to place bricks in a row, and tap them on the side and top to keep them properly seated. As you seat the bricks, fill in the back of the trench with fill dirt to hold the bricks firmly into place. Measure the bricks as you go along to keep them on the level.
Remove any landscaping fabric that is visible above the trench, and put grass seed on the soil around the bricks.
Tips & Warnings
Shallowly seated landscaping bricks eventually will work loose over several years and will need to be reseated.

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